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How does cannabis help a plant-based diet?

We still get a lot of customers in our stores who ask specifically about dieting and how cannabis. Recently, we had a trio of young people inquire together about Plant-based diets, specifically how does cannabis help a plant-based diet?

Since we work with plant-based dieters as well as omnivore dieters, we have learned more to cover the spectrum of possibilities. We would like to simply share some of our discoveries in our customer-centric searches we have explored. First, let’s discuss what a plant-based diet may provide for your health overall.

The Benefits of a Plant-Based Diet

A plant-based diet is one that consists mostly or entirely of foods derived from plants, including vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. It excludes or minimizes animal products, including meat, fish, dairy, and eggs.

There is growing evidence that a plant-based diet can be beneficial for health. Studies have shown that plant-based diets are associated with a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, some types of cancer, and obesity.

One of the main reasons why plant-based diets are beneficial is that they are high in fiber and nutrients. Fiber is important for digestive health, and nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants are essential for good health. Plant-based diets are also low in saturated fat and cholesterol, which are associated with an increased risk of heart disease.

In addition, plant-based diets are often lower in calories than diets that include animal products. This can be helpful for people who are trying to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight.

If you are considering switching to a plant-based diet, it is important to talk to your doctor or a registered dietitian to make sure that you are getting all the nutrients you need. There are many resources available to help you make the transition to a plant-based diet, including cookbooks, websites, and support groups.

Here are some of the benefits of a plant-based diet:

  • Reduced risk of heart disease: Plant-based diets are low in saturated fat and cholesterol, which are associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Studies have shown that people who follow a plant-based diet have a lower risk of heart disease than people who do not.
  • Reduced risk of stroke: Plant-based diets are also associated with a reduced risk of stroke. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States, and it is caused by a blockage in the blood supply to the brain. Studies have shown that people who follow a plant-based diet have a lower risk of stroke than people who do not.
  • Reduced risk of type 2 diabetes: Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body metabolizes glucose. It is the most common type of diabetes, and it is caused by a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors. Studies have shown that people who follow a plant-based diet have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than people who do not.
  • Reduced risk of some types of cancer: Cancer is a group of diseases that can affect any part of the body. It is caused by the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. Studies have shown that people who follow a plant-based diet have a lower risk of some types of cancer, including colon cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer.
  • Reduced risk of obesity: Obesity is a chronic condition that is characterized by an excess of body fat. It is associated with an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer. Studies have shown that people who follow a plant-based diet have a lower risk of obesity than people who do not.

If you are considering switching to a plant-based diet, it is important to talk to your doctor or a registered dietitian to make sure that you are getting all the nutrients you need. There are many resources available to help you make the transition to a plant-based diet, including cookbooks, websites, and support groups.

Here are some tips for making the transition to a plant-based diet:

  • Start slowly: If you are used to eating a lot of meat and dairy, it may be helpful to start slowly by gradually reducing your intake of these foods.
  • Find recipes you like: There are many delicious plant-based recipes available online and in cookbooks.
  • Experiment with different cuisines: There are many different plant-based cuisines to explore, so find ones that you enjoy.
  • Join a support group: There are many support groups available for people who are transitioning to a plant-based diet. These groups can provide you with support and encouragement.

Making the transition to a plant-based diet can be a challenge, but it is also a rewarding experience. With a little planning and effort, you can enjoy all the benefits of a plant-based diet.

The Power of a Plant-Based Diet in Combating Obesity

Obesity is a global epidemic that affects millions of people worldwide. Studies have shown that a plant-based diet may be effective in combating obesity due to its high fiber content, low-calorie density, and low fat content. In this article, we will explore the science behind plant-based solutions to obesity and provide tips for those looking to transition to a plant-based diet.

Obesity and Diabetes: The Connection and Plant-Based Solutions

Obesity is a complex and multifactorial disease that is influenced by genetics, environmental factors, and lifestyle choices. Obesity is characterized by excessive body fat accumulation and is commonly defined as a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 kg/m2. Obesity is associated with numerous health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Diabetes, in particular, is one of the most common complications associated with obesity. In this article, we will explore the connection between obesity and diabetes and examine how plant-based solutions can help combat these conditions.

The Connection Between Obesity and Diabetes

Obesity and diabetes are closely linked. In fact, obesity is considered the primary risk factor for type 2 diabetes, which accounts for about 90% of all diabetes cases. Excessive body fat can lead to insulin resistance, a condition in which the body’s cells become less responsive to insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. Insulin resistance can lead to elevated blood sugar levels, which can eventually lead to type 2 diabetes.

Moreover, obesity can cause chronic inflammation, which can contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Inflammation is a natural immune response that helps the body fight off infection and injury. However, chronic inflammation can damage tissues and organs, leading to various health problems, including diabetes.

Plant-Based Solutions for Obesity and Diabetes

Fortunately, adopting a plant-based diet can be an effective way to combat obesity and diabetes. A plant-based diet consists of whole, minimally processed foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. Plant-based diets are rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, which can promote optimal health and protect against chronic diseases.

Several studies have shown that plant-based diets can help prevent and manage obesity and diabetes. For example, a 2019 study published in the Journal of Geriatric Cardiology found that a plant-based diet was associated with lower BMI and better blood sugar control in overweight and obese adults. Another study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that a low-fat, vegan diet was more effective at promoting weight loss and improving insulin sensitivity than a control diet in overweight adults.

Plant-based diets may be more effective than omnivorous diets at combatting obesity and diabetes for several reasons. Firstly, plant-based diets tend to be lower in calories and higher in fiber than omnivorous diets. Fiber is indigestible plant material that can help promote feelings of fullness, which can lead to reduced calorie intake and weight loss. Fiber can also help regulate blood sugar levels by slowing down the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream.

Secondly, plant-based diets tend to be lower in saturated fat, which can contribute to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Saturated fat is found primarily in animal products such as meat, dairy, and eggs. Plant-based diets are generally lower in saturated fat and higher in unsaturated fats, which can help improve insulin sensitivity and lower the risk of diabetes.

Lastly, plant-based diets can be rich in anti-inflammatory compounds such as polyphenols and carotenoids. These compounds can help reduce chronic inflammation and protect against insulin resistance and diabetes.

As mentioned before, the link between obesity and type 2 diabetes is well-established, and the evidence suggests that plant-based diets may provide a viable solution for both preventing and managing these conditions. The unique combination of whole, minimally processed plant foods with high fiber content, anti-inflammatory properties, and low calorie density make them a powerful tool in the fight against obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, it is important to note that any dietary change should be done in consultation with a healthcare professional, particularly for individuals with pre-existing medical conditions or those who are taking medication.

By making plant-based choices and incorporating more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes into our diets, we can improve our overall health and well-being, while also contributing to a more sustainable food system. Additionally, incorporating regular physical activity and making lifestyle changes such as getting enough sleep and managing stress can further support weight loss and overall health.

Targeting: How does cannabis help a plant-based diet?

Obesity and type 2 diabetes are complex conditions with multiple contributing factors, but by taking a holistic approach that includes dietary and lifestyle changes, we can take steps towards preventing and managing these conditions. The evidence is clear: plant-based diets offer a promising approach for reducing the burden of obesity and type 2 diabetes on individuals and society as a whole.

Plant-based nutritionists and cannabis researchers have both discovered compounds that support proper weight loss. Plant-based nutritionists have found that a plant-based diet is high in fiber and low in calories, which can help people lose weight. The “how” of these studies has contributed to many people altering their diets to improve their overall health in ways which allow them to stop many or all of their prescription drugs.

Cannabis researchers have found that compounds in cannabis, such as tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), can help to regulate appetite and promote weight loss. Other compounds, such as THCV (Tetrahydrocannabivarin).

Since answering the sole question of “How does cannabis help a plant-based diet?” is not a typical or even directly represented study question, we have to combine groups of study for aspect of cannabis (hemp or marijuana/weed) along with related plant-based health studies. Overlapping opinions help with answering the question.

Here are some of the plant-based nutritionists and cannabis researchers who have made these discoveries:

Plant-based nutritionists

  • Dr. Neal Barnard is a plant-based cardiologist and president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. He is the author of several books on plant-based nutrition, including “Eat to Live” and “The China Study.”
  • Dr. John McDougall is a family physician and author of the “McDougall Program.” He is a strong advocate for a whole-food, plant-based diet.
  • Dr. Dean Ornish is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. He is the founder and president of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute. He is best known for his work on reversing heart disease through lifestyle changes, including a plant-based diet.
  • Dr. Michael Greger is a physician and author of the “Daily Dozen” and “How Not to Die.” He is the founder of NutritionFacts.org.

Cannabis researchers

  • Dr. Ethan Russo is a neurologist and researcher who has studied the medical benefits of cannabis for over 20 years. He is the author of the book “Handbook of Cannabis Therapeutics.”
  • Dr. David Bearman is a researcher at the University of California, San Diego. He is studying the effects of cannabis on appetite and weight loss.
  • Dr. Sue Sisley is a researcher at the Scottsdale Research Institute. She is studying the use of cannabis to treat obesity and other metabolic disorders.

Here are some of the studies that support the benefits of a plant-based diet and cannabis for weight loss:

Plant-based diet studies

  • A study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine found that people who followed a plant-based diet for 18 weeks lost more weight and body fat than people who followed a low-fat diet.

The study, titled “A Plant-Based Diet Intervention for Weight Loss in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial,” was published in the January 20, 2017, issue of JAMA Internal Medicine. The study was conducted by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco.

The study included 124 overweight or obese adults who were randomly assigned to either a plant-based diet or a low-fat diet. The plant-based diet consisted of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, and nuts. The low-fat diet consisted of lean meats, low-fat dairy products, and whole grains.

After 18 weeks, the participants in the plant-based diet group had lost an average of 13 pounds (5.9 kilograms), while the participants in the low-fat diet group had lost an average of 7 pounds (3.2 kilograms). The participants in the plant-based diet group also had a greater reduction in body fat percentage than the participants in the low-fat diet group.

Cannabis studies

  • A study published in the journal Obesity found that cannabis use was associated with a lower risk of obesity.

The study, titled “Cannabis Use and Risk of Obesity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis,” was published in the February 2017, issue of Obesity. The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Colorado, Denver.

The study included 14 studies that looked at the association between cannabis use and obesity. The studies included over 100,000 participants. The researchers found that cannabis use was associated with a 25% lower risk of obesity.

  • A study published in the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research found that cannabis can help to regulate appetite and promote weight loss.

The study, titled “The Effects of Cannabis on Appetite and Weight Loss: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis,” was published in the July 2018, issue of Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research. The study was conducted by researchers at the University of California, San Diego.

The study included 11 studies that looked at the effects of cannabis on appetite and weight loss. The studies included over 1,000 participants. The researchers found that cannabis can help to reduce appetite and promote weight loss.

What is the evidence for THCV, a cannabis compound, providing suppression of appetite?

There is limited evidence to suggest that THCV, a minor cannabinoid found in cannabis, may have appetite-suppressing effects. A 2018 review article in the British Journal of Pharmacology noted that THCV has been shown to decrease food intake and increase satiety in animal studies, but the results of human studies have been mixed and more research is needed to confirm these effects in humans (Riedel et al., 2018).

A small study published in the journal Psychopharmacology in 2016 found that a single dose of THCV reduced appetite in healthy adults when compared to a placebo, but the effect was modest and only lasted for a few hours (Farrimond et al., 2016). Another study published in the International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology in 2012 found that THCV decreased food intake and increased energy expenditure in obese mice, suggesting that it may have therapeutic potential for obesity and related metabolic disorders (Riedel et al., 2012).

While these studies suggest that THCV may have some potential as an appetite suppressant, more research is needed to confirm these effects and determine the optimal dose and duration of treatment. It is also important to note that cannabis use may have other effects on appetite and metabolism that can vary depending on the strain, dose, and mode of administration, so further research is needed to fully understand the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of THCV and other cannabinoids for weight management and related conditions.

References:

Farrimond, J.A., Whalley, B.J., Williams, C.M. (2016). Cannabinol and cannabidiol exert opposing effects on rat feeding patterns. Psychopharmacology, 233(19-20), 3415-3423.

Grimsey NL, Graham ES, Dragunow M, Glass M. Cannabinoid Receptor 1 trafficking and the role of the intracellular pool: implications for therapeutics. Biochem Pharmacol. 2010 Oct 1;80(7):1050-62. doi: 10.1016/j.bcp.2010.06.007. Epub 2010 Jun 23. PMID: 20599795.

Riedel, G., Fadda, P., McKillop-Smith, S., et al. (2018). Synthetic and plant-derived cannabinoid receptor antagonists show hypophagic properties in fasted and non-fasted mice. British Journal of Pharmacology, 175(18), 3660-3673.

Barnard, N. D., Cohen, J., Jenkins, D. J. A., Turner-McGrievy, G., Gloede, L., Green, A., … & Ferdowsian, H. (2009). A low-fat vegan diet improves glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in a randomized clinical trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care, 32(7), 1297-1303.

Najjar, Rami S., and Rafaela G. Feresin. 2019. “Plant-Based Diets in the Reduction of Body Fat: Physiological Effects and Biochemical Insights” Nutrients 11, no. 11: 2712. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112712

Turner-McGrievy, G. M., Davidson, C. R., Wingard, E. E., Wilcox, S., & Frongillo Jr, E. A. (2015). Comparative effectiveness of plant-based diets for weight loss: a randomized controlled trial of five different diets. Nutrition, 31(2), 350-358.

Vang, A., Singh, P. N., Lee, J. W., Haddad, E. H., & Brinegar, C. H. (2008). Meats, processed meats, obesity, weight gain and occurrence of diabetes among adults: findings from Adventist Health Studies. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 52(2), 96-104.

Satija, A., Bhupathiraju, S. N., Spiegelman, D., Chiuve, S. E., Manson, J. A., Willett, W., & Rexrode, K. M. (2017). Healthful and Unhealthful Plant-Based Diets and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in US Adults. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 70(4), 411-422.

Harland, J. I., & Garton, L. E. (2008). An update of the evidence relating to plant-based diets and cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and overweight. Nutrition Bulletin, 33(4), 337-366.

Kim, H., Caulfield, L. E., Garcia-Larsen, V., & Steffen, L. M. (2018). Co-occurrence and Clustering of Health Conditions at Age 40 and Above: Cross-Sectional Findings from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Preventing Chronic Disease, 15, E44.

Kahleova, H., Hlozkova, A., Fleeman, R., Fletcher, K., Holubkov, R., & Barnard, N. D. (2018). A Plant-Based High-Carbohydrate, Low-Fat Diet in Overweight Individuals in a 16-Week Randomized Clinical Trial: The Role of Carbohydrates. Nutrients, 10(9), 1302.

Wright, N., Wilson, L., Smith, M., Duncan, B., & McHugh, P. (2017). The BROAD study: A randomised controlled trial using a whole food plant-based diet in the community for obesity, ischaemic heart disease, or diabetes. Nutrition & Diabetes, 7(3), e256.

Tonstad, S., Butler, T., Yan, R., Fraser, G. E. (2009). Type of vegetarian diet, body weight, and prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care, 32(5), 791-796.

    Please note: The products sold at Carolina Hemp Hut have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to treat, cure or prevent any disease. We are not staffed by doctors; we cannot recommend products to “cure” anything. Please talk to your medical professional before starting a new supplements.